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Mosquito Spraying Scheduled at the Bibb-Houston County Line

Mosquito Spraying Scheduled at the Bibb-Houston County Line

Mosquito spraying happens tonight in the Shirley Hills and Wood Valley areas as well as in south Bibb County.

That's from 7-11 p.m. in these areas:

 

SHIRLEY HILLS/WOOD VALLEY

Bound by the following streets, roads, landmarks or bodies of water.

BORDERS:                

  • NORTH--the Bibb Co./Jones Co. line.
  • WEST--a line from the Ocmulgee River past the Masonic Home north to the Bibb Co./Jones Co. line past Upper River Rd.
  • SOUTH--I-75 north of the I-16 interchange south to I-16 to Spring St.
  • EAST--North Ave. to Gray Hwy. to the Bibb Co./Jones Co. line.

and in South Bibb County:

 

Bound by the following streets, roads, landmarks or bodies of water.

BORDERS:    

VA Doesn't Follow Up with Many Veterans After Mental Healthcare

VA Doesn't Follow Up with Many Veterans After Mental Healthcare

 

Presciption-Drug Take-Back Program is Saturday

Presciption-Drug Take-Back Program is Saturday

People in Central  Georgia can to dispose of unwanted prescription medication during Saturday's national prescription drug take-back day.
    
Saturday, April 27, there will be several locations taking your unwanted and unused prescription drugs to safely dispose of them.

Cleaning out medicine cabinets and securing medications will reduce the chance of someone abusing prescription medication that is not intended for them, and will protect surplus drugs from theft.

Take-Back events will run from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in Macon, Forsyth, Eastman and Eatonton .

Pollen Count 'High' in the Macon Area

Pollen Count 'High' in the Macon Area

Some mixed news for allergy sufferers:

While the tree pollen count is still high at 1420, that's down from last Wednesday's 3,600 count, according to Dr. Plaxico's Allergy and Asthma Clinic in Macon.

Weeds and grass pollen count is now in the moderate range. That count is up from last week when the weed pollen was absent and the grass count was observed as low.

Recent War Vets Face Hiring Obstacle: PTSD Bias

Recent War Vets Face Hiring Obstacle: PTSD Bias

BY USATODAY
By Gregg Zoroya

 

Military leaders and veterans' advocates worry about hidden hiring discrimination against Iraq and Afghanistan war vets by employers who see the veterans perhaps as emotionally damaged.

A key fear is how this could be contributing to stubbornly higher joblessness among the generation that volunteered to serve in the military after the 9/11 attacks. Because employers are barred by law from asking job applicants about mental health conditions, many assume that any veteran can be afflicted with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) although the vast majority returned from war without emotional problems, researchers and veterans advocates say.

"There is a need to be concerned about this issue and this stigma," says Kevin Schmiegel, a retired Marine lieutenant colonel and executive director of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Hiring our Heroes program.

Houston County Jobless Rates Below Georgia Average

Houston County Jobless Rates Below Georgia Average

Houston County's jobless rate was 7.2 percent in February compared to Georgia's 8.6 percent and metro Macon's nine percent.

The Georgia Department of Labor says  February unemployment declined to nine percent in metro Macon.

According to a release, that's down from February 2012, when unemployment for metro Macon was 10 percent.

Georgia's February unemployment rate is 8.6 percent, not seasonally adjusted.

From January to February, metro Macon gained 500 jobs and fewer people were laid off.

RELATED | Macon's Unemployment Up in January 2013

Most jobs were added in the professional, business, education, health care, trade, transportation, warehousing, leisure and hospitality industries as well as in in local government.

Metro Macon includes Bibb, Crawford, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs counties.

Georgia Legislature Passes Concussion Bill

The law that cleared the state legislature Tuesday regulates how coaches, athletes, and healthcare professionals manage concussions.

The Senate passed what's called the "Return to Play Act". The House also approved it at the end of last month.

Jeff Hopp, member of the Georgia Concussion Coalition, helped put together the legislation and hopes it will help more than just the athletes.

"It should make life a lot easier for the healthcare providers," he says, "because hopefully the education part will get out there and we can focus on taking care of the athletes and the health and welfare of the athletes, and not have to worry about 'are the parents and are the athletes or are the coaches, are they going to know what to do, how to handle things, what they're looking at,' That sort of thing."

The act has three main points. The first is education.